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Contact

Bonnie's
Dog & Cat
Grooming


1364 E Street SE
Washington, DC 20003
Phone:
202.548.0044
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Bonnie's Dog & Cat Grooming

Nail Trimming

You can bring your pet in to get its nails trimmed anytime the shop is open (hours) no appointment necessary. We can cut and file the nails and will use either a nail trimmer or a dremel tool depending on how your pet reacts to the tools we have available.

Some dogs really hate to have their nails “clipped” because the clipping tool squeezes the nail when it cuts and pinches the nerve inside the nail. These dogs (typically Basset Hounds, Dachshunds, and other short legged breeds) usually are more cooperative with a filing procedure done with a dremel. Some dogs really hate the vibration or sound of the dremmel and are much more comfortable with a clipping tool. This is why we always ask if we have trimmed your dogs nails in the past, and which tool they preferred.

“Filing” your dog’s nails with a dremmel tool will leave the smoothest edge and allows us to trim the nail as short as possible with less risk of cutting into the “quick” or vein that runs through the center of the nail.

We usually try to trim the nails as short as possible, without cutting or filing into the “quick” (a vein and nerve) that runs through the center of the nail, but there is NO foolproof method to avoid occasionally cutting the quick, and causing a nail to bleed after it is trimmed.

Experience with many different dogs, and trimming many differently looking nails is the only way professionals learn to judge, and guess, where the quick ends in your dog’s nail but even groomers and veterinarians who have decades of experience trimming nails will cut into the quick with some regularity.

Cutting the nail “quick”, is NOT a medical emergency and it will not cause your pet discomfort after the nail trimming is over. We will apply nail styptic designed to stop the bleeding.

We will NOT intentionally cut into the nail quick to cause it to shorten.

DIFFICULT DOGS:  We can handle some difficult dogs by using a muzzle or a second person to help with restraint but it is possible for a dog to injure itself fighting against restraint and we may suggest that your dog needs to be handled at a vet’s office where he can be tranquilized or sedated for his nail trimming.